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 Gatsby Essay is Gatsby.

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ShinyPuffy

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PostSubject: Gatsby Essay is Gatsby.   Sat Apr 24, 2010 4:58 pm

Gatsby is a book for old people. Why do I have to write an essay for old people?



^ PROOF THAT GATSBY IS GAY




OLD SPORT!!!!
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Troll

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PostSubject: Re: Gatsby Essay is Gatsby.   Sat Apr 24, 2010 6:58 pm

School requires.
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Caruso

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PostSubject: Re: Gatsby Essay is Gatsby.   Sat Apr 24, 2010 7:13 pm

You aren't writing it for old people, you're writing it about old people
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kiki.i

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PostSubject: Re: Gatsby Essay is Gatsby.   Sun Apr 25, 2010 6:00 pm

weeelll, one COULD say that he's "old fashioned" and prefers a more "traditional" style.... >_> i think...

so what do you need HELP on? (if you say "everything" then i can't help XD if that is indeed the case, tell us from the beginning: what's your thesis? what are you the three points you're trying to prove? do you have enough backup?)
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ShinyPuffy

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PostSubject: Re: Gatsby Essay is Gatsby.   Sun Apr 25, 2010 8:44 pm

Here is my essay (careful, it's long):

God damn, I hate how Mrs. Steece forces me to write like this. She's not fit to grade essays.



Hope is the lifeblood of the human soul, keeping one alive and joyful: without it, one is little more than an aimless shell without any reason to truly live. In F. Scott Fitzergerald’s timeless novel, The Great Gatsby, this cannot be truer. Set on Long Island during the 1920s, the main character Jay Gatsby vies for the affection of his long-lost love, Daisy Buchanan. In Gatsby’s quest, both he and the local mechanic, George Wilson, exhibit the result when one’s soul is filled with hope: a person with a true will to live. On the other hand, Daisy and ironically, Wilson, show both the end result of a person who has been deprived of hope: a miserable entity devoid of meaning.

When one has hope, one can accomplish nearly anything. Gatsby, the man whom the novel derives its namesake, harbors a great amount of hope. For example, his heritage, which involves two poor parents, failed to snuff out his hope of becoming fabulously wealthy, which Gatsby eventually achieves. But Gatsby’s most obvious display of his undying hope is his pursuit for Daisy’s love. After a several-year rift in their previous relationship, Gatsby comes to Long Island searching for Daisy, possibly to the point of stalking, even after she is married. He does everything in his power to hope that Daisy will fall in love with him again. At the very thought of failure, the narrator, Nick, explains, "He [Gatsby] wouldn’t consider it. He couldn’t possibly leave Daisy…He was clutching at some last hope and I couldn’t bear to shake him free." If Gatsby did not have hope, he easily would have given up at his first sight of Daisy and suffered. However, his undying hope empowers him and allows him to be truly happy during his moments with Daisy, even when it becomes painfully evident that she chooses her husband instead of him. With hope, Gatsby accomplishes all the things he wanted to in order to become absolutely fulfilled. Another man, George Wilson, the owner of a car repair shop in a decrepit slum, is shown to be an incredibly hopeful person in the novel, comparable even to Gatsby. “I can’t complain…When are you [Daisy’s husband] going to send me that car?” Here, Wilson is shown doing everything he can to earn enough money to ultimately turn his life around. By fixing up a car and re-selling it, Wilson hopes to earn the money to move out of the slums, the valley of ashes, and make a new life for both himself and his wife. Every waking moment, Wilson works hard at this task, hope giving him a reason to get out of the valley of ashes. One without hope would be unable to carry this extreme plan out and sustain it: Wilson, however, with his hope, has the power to complete such a goal and live a fulfilling and happy life.

Both Gatsby and Wilson show that hope makes those who possess it content. However, those without it are ultimately despondent and miserable. Wilson and Daisy are prime examples of this truth. Despite being a man once full of hope, Wilson is also a prime example of the result of a person with absolutely no hope. Devastated after realizing his wife is hosting an affair under his nose, Wilson loses all will, meaning, and hope, ultimately transforming himself into a rambling, paranoid man. Upon uncovering this scandal, Wilson goes mad, ranting, “You [Wilson’s wife] may fool me, but you can’t fool God!’” As losing his wife also means losing a new life, Wilson, who normally would never start a tirade involving an almighty being, is driven to the point of insanity. His life has become meaningless in the absence of hope. Without hope, Wilson loses a reason to live, and eventually commits suicide after murdering Gatsby in the process. Daisy, on the other hand, suffers similarly, yet differently than Wilson because of a lack of hope. When Gatsby and Daisy first met as youths, Daisy promised Gatsby she would wait for him, as Gatsby had to move away as part of a military tour. However, Daisy grows impatient, eventually completely losing her hope in Gatsby and marrying another man after being lured by “a string of pearls valued at three hundred and fifty thousand dollars.” While Daisy now has all the money she could ask for, a lack of hope prevents her from truly living a happy life, even with Gatsby. “‘I never loved him [Daisy’s husband],’ she said, with perceptible reluctance.” Her deficit of hope harbors a lack of determination to truly live, as her failure to denounce her love to her husband brings about an equal failure to live a life with Gatsby. Daisy without hope is a pitiful excuse for a person, and Wilson without hope is a mindless paranoiac. Both parties live lives devoid of meaning in the absence of hope.

Hope brings happiness and fulfillment to those who have it, and those without any hope at all equally suffer in their meaningless lives. Gatsby’s undying hope brings him to success, allowing him to experience true happiness with Daisy. Wilson’s similarly powerful hope allows him to rise every morning to a day with meaning in his goal to work his way out of the slums. Ironically, as much as Wilson symbolizes the effects of those who have hope, he exhibits the horrifying result of one who lacks hope. When his hope leaves him, he becomes a being devoid of vitality and meaning. Daisy, on the other hand, suffers similarly. Her lack of hope condemns her to a life without true happiness. Those with hope are capable of truly living, while those without it carry on as empty, aimless shells of suffering.
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